Updates

Alliance Launched To Save Bees

Sixty-five chefs, restaurant owners and other culinary leaders joined us to launch the Bee Friendly Food Alliance. Through the Alliance, chefs and restaurateurs are calling attention to the importance of bees to our food supply, the dramatic die-off of bee populations, and the need to protect our pollinators. LEARN MORE.

Blog Post

Another record-setting quarter for solar, explained in 3 stats

Another quarter down, another solar record set. According to the latest figures from GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), solar had its best second quarter in history. Below, I’ve selected three key stats that I think best help to explain their findings, and the state of solar overall.

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Report | Environment Florida

Less Shelter from the Storm

After Hurricanes Harvey and Irma recently pummeled our coasts, Environment Florida warned that pending budget proposals from the Trump administration and Congress threaten key programs that protect our communities from storm-related impacts. The group documented threats to programs that prevent or curb flooding, sewage overflows and leaks from toxic waste sites.

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News Release | Environment Florida

​Hurricane Irma and Sewage Spills:

As Florida recovers from Hurricane Irma and the Caribbean braces for yet another devastating storm, a new factsheet by Environment Florida finds that many of the sewer systems in the state’s biggest coastal cities were ill-prepared to handle Irma’s heavy rains and high tides. Over 9 million gallons of wastewater have spilled across Florida in the wake of Hurricane Irma, including raw sewage which contains pathogens that threaten both the environment and public health. 

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Report | Environment Florida

Hurricane Irma and Sewage Spills

Florida’s sewage systems are already strained by the Florida coast’s rapidly growing population. City growth policies encourage housing and economic development without updating necessary infrastructure. In many of the state’s biggest coastal cities, sewer systems were ill-prepared to handle Irma’s heavy rains and high tides. 

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